STEM based Educational Support

How i-Zone-3 can help your school

A 2013 study from the U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics found that many college students are dropping out of STEM degree programs despite the dramatic career growth in these fields. The study found that 69 percent of students who entered STEM degree programs dropped out, either leaving college permanently or switching to a different major.

Some students cited intense theory and lack of practical application as a reason for leaving the fields. To counteract this problem, we turned to virtual reality (VR) as a one method to make STEM learning more hands-on, exciting, and practical.

How Virtual Reality Benefits STEM Education


According to a 2013 report, “Augmented and Mixed Reality: Systems and Application,” virtual reality can be used with STEM subjects in hundreds of ways—the list is nearly endless. VR can help students, even students much younger than college-aged, see the practical side of STEM. It might even plant seeds of curiosity that could one day lead to higher education and even a career in a STEM field.

At our facility we demonstrate, via VR experiences, a range of scientific learning options - from the solar system, to biology - we demonstrate the powerful future of not only VR, but simulation systems and their practical applications in a range of arenas.

Book Your School Trip Today
7th Grade to 12th Grade


Hour 1 - Introduction to Light and Stereoscopic Vision
Hour 2 - VR 360 degree Video Playback / VR Underwater experience

During this science school trip, students will discover what light is and how we see.  They will learn about stereoscopic vision that most creatures have and see how virtual reality mimics stereoscopic vision to make the brain believe it is in an alternate surrounding.

BOOK a School Trip ($750)

Fill in the form below to prepare your school science trip.

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Mini Courses


Our student and teacher mini courses cover the following:

1) Basic Programming

           Will learn to write a simple drawing program over the course of three weeks (3 lessons)
           Will need your to bring your own Windows laptop (Win XP, Vista, 7, 8, 10)
           Every Saturday between 2pm and 3pm
           Lesson will end at 3pm regardless if late
           $30 per hour lesson - paid at reception

2) Basic Electronics
3) Introductory Algebra
4) Introductory Visualization Technologies
5) Introduction to Artificial Intelligence
6) Introductory Robotics
7) Introductory Physics



Georgia Standards

Below are the Georgia standards we currently cater to:

S1P1 FIFTH GRADE
S1P2 FIFTH GRADE
S2E1 SECOND GRADE
S2E2 SECOND GRADE
S2P1 SECOND GRADE
S2P2 SECOND GRADE
S3P1 THIRD GRADE
S4E1 FOURTH GRADE
S4E2 FOURTH GRADE
S4P1 FOURTH GRADE
S4P2 FOURTH GRADE
S4P3 FOURTH GRADE
S6E1 SIX GRADE
S6E2 SIX GRADE
S8P2 EIGHTH GRADE
S8P3 EIGHTH GRADE
S8P4 EIGHTH GRADE
S8P5 EIGHTH GRADE
SPS8 HIGH SCHOOL
SP1 HIGH SCHOOL
SP2 HIGH SCHOOL

S1P1. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to investigate light and sound.

a. Use observations to construct an explanation of how light is required to make objects visible.
b. Ask questions to identify and compare sources of light.
c. Plan and carry out an investigation of shadows by placing objects at various points from a source of light.
d. Construct an explanation supported by evidence that vibrating materials can make sound and that sound can make materials vibrate.
e. Design a signal that can serve as an emergency alert using light and/or sound to communicate over a distance.


S1P2. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to demonstrate the effects of magnets on other magnets and other objects.

a. Construct an explanation of how magnets are used in everyday life. (Clarification statement: Everyday life uses could include refrigerator magnets, toys, magnetic latches, and name tags.)
b. Plan and carry out an investigation to demonstrate how magnets attract and repel each other and the effect of magnets on common objects.


S2E1. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about stars having different sizes and brightness.

a. Ask questions to describe the physical attributes (size and brightness) of stars.
b. Construct an argument to support the claim that although the sun appears to be the brightest and largest star, it is actually medium in size and brightness.

S2E2. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to develop an understanding of the patterns of the sun and the moon and the sun’s effect on Earth.

a. Plan and carry out an investigation to determine the effect of the position of the sun in relation to a fixed object on Earth at various times of the day.
b. Design and build a structure that demonstrates how shadows change throughout the day.
c. Represent data in tables and/or graphs of the length of the day and night to recognize the change in seasons.
d. Use data from personal observations to describe, illustrate, and predict how the appearance of the moon changes over time in a pattern. (Clarification statement: Students are not required to know the names of the phases of the moon or understand the tilt of the Earth.)


S3P1. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about the ways heat energy is transferred and measured.

a. Ask questions to identify sources of heat energy. (Clarification statement: Examples could include sunlight, friction, and burning.)
b. Plan and carry out an investigation to gather data using thermometers to produce tables and charts that illustrate the effect of sunlight on various objects. (Clarification statement: The use of both Fahrenheit and Celsius temperature scales is expected.)
c. Use tools and every day materials to design and construct a device/structure that will increase/decrease the warming effects of sunlight on various materials.(Clarification statement: Conduction, convection, and radiation are taught in upper grades.)


S4E1. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to compare and contrast the physical attributes of stars and planets.

a. Ask questions to compare and contrast technological advances that have changed the amount and type of information on distant objects in the sky.
b. Construct an argument on why some stars (including the Earth’s sun) appear to be larger or brighter than others.(Clarification statement: Differences are limited to distance and size, not age or stage of evolution.)
c. Construct an explanation of the differences between stars and planets.
d. Evaluate strengths and limitations of models of our solar system in describing relative size, order, appearance and composition of planets and the sun.(Clarification statement: Composition of planets is limited to rocky vs. gaseous.)


S4E2. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to model the effects of the position and motion of the Earth and the moon in relation to the sun as observed from the Earth.

a. Develop a model to support an explanation of why the length of day and night change throughout the year.
b. Develop a model based on observations to describe the repeating pattern of the phases of the moon (new, crescent, quarter, gibbous, and full).
c. Construct an explanation of how the Earth’s orbit, with its consistent tilt, affects seasonal changes.


S4P1. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about the nature of light and how light interacts with objects.

a. Plan and carry out investigations to observe and record how light interacts with various materials to classify them as opaque, transparent, or translucent.
b. Plan and carry out investigations to describe the path light travels from a light source to a mirror and how it is reflected by the mirror using different angles.
c. Plan and carry out an investigation utilizing everyday materials to explore examples of when light is refracted.(Clarification statement: Everyday materials could include prisms, eyeglasses, and a glass of water.)


S4P2. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about how sound is produced and changed and how sound and/or light can be used to communicate.

a. Plan and carry out an investigation utilizing everyday objects to produce sound and predict the effects of changing the strength or speed of vibrations.
b. Design and construct a device to communicate across a distance using light and/or sound.


S4P3. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about the relationship between balanced and unbalanced forces.

a. Plan and carry out an investigation on the effects of balanced and unbalanced forces on an object and communicate the results.
b. Construct an argument to support the claim that gravitational force affects the motion of an object.
c. Ask questions to identify and explain the uses of simple machines (lever, pulley, wedge, inclined plane, wheel and axle, and screw) and how forces are changed when simple machines are used to complete tasks.(Clarification statement: The use of mathematical formulas is not expected.)


S6E1. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about current scientific views of the universe and how those views evolved.

a. Ask questions to determine changes in models of Earth’s position in the solar system, and origins of the universe as evidence that scientific theories change with the addition of new information. (Clarification statement: Students should consider Earth’s position in geocentric and heliocentric models and the Big Bang as it describes the formation of the universe.)
b. Develop a model to represent the position of the solar system in the Milky Way galaxy and in the known universe.
c. Analyze and interpret data to compare and contrast the planets in our solar system in terms of:
 size relative to Earth,
 surface and atmospheric features,
 relative distance from the sun, and
 ability to support life.
d. Develop and use a model to explain the interaction of gravity and inertia that governs the motion of objects in the solar system.
e. Ask questions to compare and contrast the characteristics, composition, and location of comets, asteroids, and meteoroids.


S6E2. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about the effects of the relative positions of the sun, Earth, and moon.

a. Develop and use a model to demonstrate the phases of the moon by showing the relative positions of the sun, Earth, and moon.
b. Construct an explanation of the cause of solar and lunar eclipses.
c. Analyze and interpret data to relate the tilt of the Earth to the distribution of sunlight throughout the year and its effect on seasons.


S8P2. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about the law of conservation of energy to develop arguments that energy can transform from one form to another within a system.

a. Analyze and interpret data to create graphical displays that illustrate the relationships of kinetic energy to mass and speed, and potential energy to mass and height of an object.
b. Plan and carry out an investigation to explain the transformation between kinetic and potential energy within a system (e.g., roller coasters, pendulums, rubber bands, etc.).
c. Construct an argument to support a claim about the type of energy transformations within a system [e.g., lighting a match (light to heat), turning on a light (electrical to light)].
d. Plan and carry out investigations on the effects of heat transfer on molecular motion as it relates to the collision of atoms (conduction), through space (radiation), or in currents in a liquid or a gas (convection).


S8P3. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about cause and effect relationships between force, mass, and the motion of objects.

a. Analyze and interpret data to identify patterns in the relationships between speed and distance, and velocity and acceleration.(Clarification statement: Students should be able to analyze motion graphs, but students should not be expected to calculate velocity or acceleration.)
b. Construct an explanation using Newton’s Laws of Motion to describe the effects of balanced and unbalanced forces on the motion of an object.
c. Construct an argument from evidence to support the claim that the amount of force needed to accelerate an object is proportional to its mass (inertia).


S8P4. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to support the claim that electromagnetic (light) waves behave differently than mechanical (sound) waves.

a. Ask questions to develop explanations about the similarities and differences between electromagnetic and mechanical waves.(Clarification statement: Include transverse and longitudinal waves and wave parts such as crest, trough, compressions, and rarefactions.)
b. Construct an explanation using data to illustrate the relationship between the electromagnetic spectrum and energy.
c. Design a device to illustrate practical applications of the electromagnetic spectrum (e.g. communication, medical, military).
d. Develop and use a model to compare and contrast how light and sound waves are reflected, refracted, absorbed, diffracted or transmitted through various materials. (Clarification statement: Include echo and how color is seen but do not cover interference and scattering.)
e. Analyze and interpret data to predict patterns in the relationship between density of media and wave behavior (i.e., speed).
f. Develop and use a model (e.g., simulations, graphs, illustrations) to predict and describe the relationships between wave properties (e.g., frequency, amplitude, and wavelength) and energy.
g. Develop and use models to demonstrate the effects that lenses have on light (i.e., formation an image) and their possible technological applications.


S8P5. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about gravity, electricity, and magnetism as major forces acting in nature.

a. Construct an argument using evidence to support the claim that fields (i.e., magnetic fields, gravitational fields, and electric fields) exist between objects exerting forces on each other even when the objects are not in contact.
b. Plan and carry out investigations to demonstrate the distribution of charge in conductors and insulators. (Clarification statement: Include conduction, induction, and friction.)
c. Plan and carry out investigations to identify the factors (e.g., distance between objects, magnetic force produced by an electromagnet with varying number of wire turns, varying number or size of dry cells, and varying size of iron core) that affect the strength of electric and magnetic forces. (Clarification statement: Including, but not limited to, generators or motors.)


SPS8. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to explain the relationships among force, mass, and motion.

a. Plan and carry out an investigation and analyze the motion of an object using mathematical and graphical models. (Clarification statement: Mathematical and graphical models could include distance, displacement, speed, velocity, time and acceleration.)
b. Construct an explanation based on experimental evidence to support the claims presented in Newton’s three laws of motion.  (Clarification statement: Evidence could demonstrate relationships among force, mass, velocity, and acceleration.)
c. Analyze and interpret data to identify the relationship between mass and gravitational force for falling objects.
d. Use mathematics and computational thinking to identify the relationships between work, mechanical advantage, and simple machines.


SP1. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about the relationship between distance, displacement, speed, velocity, and acceleration as functions of time.

a. Plan and carry out an investigation of one-dimensional motion to calculate average and instantaneous speed and velocity.
• Analyze one-dimensional problems involving changes of direction, using algebraic signs to represent vector direction.
• Apply one-dimensional kinematic equations to situations with no acceleration, and positive, or negative constant acceleration.
b. Analyze and interpret data using created or obtained motion graphs to illustrate the relationships among position, velocity, and acceleration, as functions of time.
c. Ask questions to compare and contrast scalar and vector quantities.
d. Analyze and interpret data of two-dimensional motion with constant acceleration.
• Resolve position, velocity, or acceleration vectors into components (x and y, horizontal and
vertical).
• Add vectors graphically and mathematically by adding components.
• Interpret problems to show that objects moving in two dimensions have independent motions along each coordinate axis.
• Design an experiment to investigate the projectile motion of an object by collecting and analyzing data using kinematic equations.
• Predict and describe how changes to initial conditions affect the resulting motion.
• Calculate range and time in the air for a horizontally launched projectile.


SP2. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about how forces affect the motion of objects.
a. Construct an explanation based on evidence using Newton’s Laws of how forces affect the acceleration of a body.
• Explain and predict the motion of a body in absence of a force and when forces are applied using Newton’s 1st Law (principle of inertia).
• Calculate the acceleration for an object using Newton’s 2nd Law, including situations where multiple forces act together.
• Identify the pair of equal and opposite forces between two interacting bodies and relate their magnitudes and directions using Newton’s 3rd Law.
b. Develop and use a model of a Free Body Diagram to represent the forces acting on an object (both equilibrium and non-equilibrium).
c. Use mathematical representations to calculate magnitudes and vector components for typical forces including gravitational force, normal force, friction forces, tension forces, and spring forces.
d. Plan and carry out an investigation to gather evidence to identify the force or force component responsible for causing an object to move along a circular path.
• Calculate the magnitude of a centripetal acceleration.
e. Develop and use a model to describe the mathematical relationship between mass, distance, and force as expressed by Newton’s Universal Law of Gravitation.


S2P1. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about the properties of matter and changes that occur in objects.

a. Ask questions to describe and classify different objects according to their physical properties.(Clarification statement: Examples of physical properties could include color, mass, length, texture, hardness, strength, absorbency, and flexibility.)
b. Construct an explanation for how structures made from small pieces (linking cubes, building blocks) can be disassembled and then rearranged to make new and different structures.
c. Provide evidence from observations to construct an explanation that some changes in matter caused by heating or cooling can be reversed and some changes are irreversible. (Clarification statement: Changes in matter could include heating or freezing of water, baking a cake, boiling an egg.)



S2P2. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to explain the effect of a force (a push or a pull) in the movement of an object (changes in speed and direction).

a. Plan and carry out an investigation to demonstrate how pushing and pulling on an object affects the motion of the object.
b. Design a device to change the speed or direction of an object.
c. Record and analyze data to decide if a design solution works as intended to change the speed or direction of an object with a force (a push or a pull).


SPS8. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to explain the relationships among force, mass, and motion.

a. Plan and carry out an investigation and analyze the motion of an object using mathematical and graphical models.
(Clarification statement: Mathematical and graphical models could include distance, displacement, speed, velocity, time and acceleration.)
b. Construct an explanation based on experimental evidence to support the claims presented in Newton’s three laws of motion.
(Clarification statement: Evidence could demonstrate relationships among force, mass, velocity, and acceleration.)
c. Analyze and interpret data to identify the relationship between mass and gravitational force for falling objects.
d. Use mathematics and computational thinking to identify the relationships between work, mechanical advantage, and simple machines.



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Stem in The News

Below is a small list of interesting events regarding high tech STEM activities